essentials

essentials

I am an assistant professor at Northwestern University.  I study the impact of group structure on inequality.  My primary research interests are: Racial Inequality (particularly Native American inequality); Group Interactions; Occupations and Work; Social Class; and Survey Methodology.  In particular, I study the consequences of human movement and interaction on inequality.  I am also a fellow with the Institute for Policy Research and the Center for Native American and Indigenous Research.  I received my PhD from Stanford in 2016.

“We are our best selves when we interact with diverse others.”

The thread connecting my research is the simple proposition that human interaction improves well-being.  Interacting frequently, particularly with a diverse collection of others, makes us more tolerant, improves information flow, improves mental and physical health, and increases labor market participation.  Contact is important for social cohesion, generosity, and trust.
This begs the question – who do we see every day?  How often do the rich actually encounter the poor?  Does the professional class encounter the working class only when they are served, waited on, or supervising them?  My work examines how often we come in contact with one another, and how those contacts change and define us.

You may find a full copy of my cv here.

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